Trump tweets that all JFK files to be made public

Trump tweets that all JFK files to be made public

Part of a file, dated Nov. 24, 1963, quoting FBI director J. Edgar Hoover as he talks about the death of Lee Harvey Oswald, released for the first time on Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017, is photographed in Washington.  (Source: AP Photo/Jon Elswick) Part of a file, dated Nov. 24, 1963, quoting FBI director J. Edgar Hoover as he talks about the death of Lee Harvey Oswald, released for the first time on Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017, is photographed in Washington. (Source: AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

(RNN) – President Donald Trump tweeted late on Friday that the National Archives will be releasing all JFK assassination files other than names and addresses of anyone mentioned who is still living.

The National Archives late Thursday started making public about 2,800 JFK assassination records for the first time, but Trump delayed the release of other files pending review. 


The files were being released  in accordance with a 1992 law.  Trump had tweeted earlier this week that all the records would be made available, but changed course Thursday afternoon.   

The president tweeted late Friday that he made the decision after talking with chief of staff former Gen. John Kelly, the CIA and other agencies. 

"I am doing this for reasons of full disclosure, transparency and in order to put any and all conspiracy theories to rest," the president tweeted.  

To view JFK files, visit this site. 

About three decades after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, Congress passed the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992.

The Act created the Collection where all federal agencies deposited assassination-related records.

The Act added that all records so far unreleased in part or full would be made public on Oct. 26, 2017, unless withheld by the president. The withholding could take place if the release would cause ”identifiable harm to military defense, intelligence operations, law enforcement or conduct of foreign relations” and if the “identifiable harm is of such gravity that it outweighs the public interest in disclosure.”

The overall Collection is made up of 5 million pages of records, with about 88 percent fully available for viewing. About 11 percent have been released in part, or with redactions, leaving 1 percent completely withheld from public view.  The Collection includes photographs, motion pictures, sound recordings and artifacts. 

The tragic shooting of Kennedy, 46,  in Dallas has fueled speculation for years. 

Alleged assassin Lee Harvey Oswald was killed by strip club and dancehall owner Jack Ruby on Nov. 24, 1963, when he was being led out of Dallas police headquarters.

Oswald also was accused of shooting Dallas police officer J.D. Tippit about an hour after the Kennedy shooting. Oswald shot the officer on the streets of Dallas when the policeman stopped and questioned him, officials said.

Ruby died in 1967 while awaiting a new trial after a guilty verdict was overturned in 1966 by a Texas appeals court.  

The Warren Commission found Oswald acted alone in killing the president in its report released on Sept. 24, 1964.  

A U.S. House Select Committee on the assassination of Kennedy found in 1979  that “on the basis of the evidence available to it, that President John F. Kennedy was probably assassinated as a result of a conspiracy.”

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved. 

  • National politicsNational politicsMore>>

  • Moon enters talks with Trump with driver's seat at stake

    Moon enters talks with Trump with driver's seat at stake

    Monday, May 21 2018 3:12 AM EDT2018-05-21 07:12:06 GMT
    Monday, May 21 2018 1:02 PM EDT2018-05-21 17:02:43 GMT
    (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File). FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, left, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in smile during a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul, South Korea. For a few months, every...(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File). FILE - In this Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, left, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in smile during a joint news conference at the Blue House in Seoul, South Korea. For a few months, every...
    For a few months, everything seemed to be clicking into place for South Korean President Moon Jae-in as he meticulously set up crucial nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang following a year of...More >>
    For a few months, everything seemed to be clicking into place for South Korean President Moon Jae-in as he meticulously set up crucial nuclear negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang following a year of intense animosity.More >>
  • Trump pulls back from brink of trade war with China

    Trump pulls back from brink of trade war with China

    Monday, May 21 2018 1:11 AM EDT2018-05-21 05:11:48 GMT
    Monday, May 21 2018 1:02 PM EDT2018-05-21 17:02:18 GMT
    (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File). FILE - In this April 30, 2018, file photo, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a discussion at the Milken Institute Global Conference, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Mnuchin said Sunday, May 20, that the United State...(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File). FILE - In this April 30, 2018, file photo, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a discussion at the Milken Institute Global Conference, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Mnuchin said Sunday, May 20, that the United State...

    After high-level talks, Beijing agreed in a joint statement with the U.S. to "substantially reduce" America's trade deficit with China but did not commit to cut the gap by any specific amount. 

    More >>

    After high-level talks, Beijing agreed in a joint statement with the U.S. to "substantially reduce" America's trade deficit with China but did not commit to cut the gap by any specific amount. 

    More >>
  • Trials for violent protest framed as Trump vs the resistance

    Trials for violent protest framed as Trump vs the resistance

    Monday, May 21 2018 1:02 AM EDT2018-05-21 05:02:10 GMT
    Monday, May 21 2018 12:54 PM EDT2018-05-21 16:54:02 GMT
    (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). In this May 11, 2018, photo, Chelsea Manning, left, cheers with Dylan Petrohilos, right, of Washington, as they attend a rally in support of the J20 defendants in Washington. Petrohilos was one of the people detained in Ina...(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). In this May 11, 2018, photo, Chelsea Manning, left, cheers with Dylan Petrohilos, right, of Washington, as they attend a rally in support of the J20 defendants in Washington. Petrohilos was one of the people detained in Ina...
    A series of trials over a violent inauguration day protest has turned into a long-term battle of wits between the Justice Department and a grassroots political opposition network that calls itself 'the resistance.'.More >>
    A series of trials over a violent inauguration day protest has turned into a long-term battle of wits between the Justice Department and a grassroots political opposition network that calls itself 'the resistance.'.More >>
Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2018 Raycom Media. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.